Las Vegas Shooter Was a Loner

In Genesis, Chapter 3, the Lord said, “It is not good for the man to be alone.”

It’s almost as if the Lord was getting this truth out on the table early, right there in the third chapter of the first book.

“I’m a rebel Dottie, a loner. You don’t want to get messed up with a guy like me.”

These are the words of Pee-Wee Herman (not be confused with Tom Herman) from that classic flick, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure.

Pee-Wee’s words ring as true today as they did in 1985. You don’t want to get messed up with a  loner; more importantly you don’t want to be a loner. The last we heard of Pee-Wee, he was alone in the back of a movie theater in the dark doing . . . . well . . . . well, look it up. It is not good for man to be alone.

Continue reading…

Why Pastors Don’t Preach on Work

I’ve always been amazed at how rarely pastors preach on the subject of work.

My church is unusual. My pastor makes it point to do so.

But I know my church is the exception not the rule.

Why do pastors preach so rarely, if at all, on the subject of work?

After all, their church members will almost certainly spend more time working than they will ever spend at church, in small groups, or ministering to others combined. Work is the primary reason we obtain an education, and it is something we will do until we retire and often into retirement. It is what we do the majority of our waking hours. And yet, when is the last time you heard a sermon on what God expects from you at work, or why your work matters, or what it means to be a Christian employee or employer?

I’m speculating here to a certain extent because I have not seen any studies on the issue, but I suspect there are four principal reasons pastors choose to ignore the subject of work from the pulpit: Continue reading…

Interpreting Hurricanes

On August 26, 2017, I wrote about the recent eclipse.

I ended the post by stating that because we can now predict when eclipses will occur that the Lord probably does not use them as signs anymore.

Instead I suggested that the Lord probably used arbitrary, unpredictable natural events such as hurricanes.

Interestingly, over the past few weeks, beginning the day after that blog post, I have had a front row seat of the flooding in Houston, Texas as a result of Hurricane Harvey.

I watched the fourth largest city in the U.S. get as much rain in four days as it typically get in a year. I watched as people lost everything they had in a flood experts said should only happen once in every 800 years. I also watched as churches gave money, their time, and their labor to help the victims of this natural disaster.

So, the question arises, “Was Hurricane Harvey some form of judgment?” The answer is I don’t know know, but I don’t think it matters whether we know or not. It doesn’t matter because what this disaster has done has had the same effect as if it was judgment. Continue reading…

When an Eclipse Meant Something

Like many Americans, this past Monday I gathered with others outside to experience the eclipse.

Where I live, we only had about a 75% eclipse, but it was still interesting to watch it get semi-dark in the middle of any otherwise sunny day.

As you know if you have been following this blog, three weeks ago, The Wife and I returned from our Reformation Tour in Prague and Germany.

While there, I had started reading the letters of Jan Hus. While I was on the treadmill yesterday I was getting toward the end of his letters and came to the point in his life where he was jailed in Constance, Germany and was getting ready to make his first defense before Sigismund, King of Germany, just a month before he would be burned at the stake. In introducing the letter Hus wrote that day, the editor mentioned that:

“On the 7th Hus was again brought before the Council. The friary was surrounded by the town guard, and at an early hour the Council assembled for Mass. While this ritual was proceeding the sun was eclipsed, to the consternation of all. An hour later, about 8 A.M., Hus was brought before before the court.” Continue reading…

Holy Spirit Inspired Management

I’ve written much here regarding what it means to be an employee and work empowered or inspired by the Holy Spirit.

I have not addressed it though specifically from the perspective of management.

Today, at church, I was speaking with one of our elders who was struggling with managing a subordinate with whom he had become increasingly frustrated.

He had not said anything to the subordinate but instead tried to be patient; then he got frustrated and had to control his emotions when he did finally talk to him. Continue reading…